Ibels, H.S.

1897 Original French Art Nouveau Poster, Les Programmes Illustres, Grand Papa - Ibels

$100.00
  • 1897 Original French Art Nouveau Poster, Les Programmes Illustres, Grand Papa - Ibels

Ibels, H.S.

1897 Original French Art Nouveau Poster, Les Programmes Illustres, Grand Papa - Ibels

$100.00

Date: 1897
Size:  9.25 x 12.5 inches
Notes: Poster, Small, Lithograph
Artist: Ibels, H. S.

About The Poster:    A color plate from an exquisite book called Les Programmes Illustres, by Ernest Maindron, published in 1897, by Librairie Nilsson-Per Lamm, Paris purchased at auction, and filled with the most unbelievably detailed and remarkable works of art we have seen... granted we are biased and truly moved by works from this period, by truly, these are gems, in remarkable, mint condition, and more than 100 years old. The auction catalog reads: " 'I often ask myself what they, the curious of the year 2000, will think of us, whom we are cut off from by a century of dreadful events; them, knowing that which we don't yet know and that we nearly suspect, what will they say of our old frivolity with all that has passed? Won't they pity us, like we today have pity for the aristocratic society whose ancient prints we refer to with carelessness and levity?' Thus mused Pierre Veber in his prefacing comments for the Programmes Illustres, a hardcover compendium of some of the most beautiful menus, invitations, business cards and announcements of the Belle Epoque. Little could he have known how off the mark his thoughts were ..." (Rennert) Each sheet is 9.25 x 12.5 inches, and the images on the sheet vary - this one, by H.S. Ibels, measures 6 x 8 inches and is for the Theatre Libre's presentation of Grand Papa (who seems a little worse for wear...) Of Ibels, it has been written "(b Paris, 30 Nov 1867; d Paris, Feb 1936). French printmaker, illustrator and painter. He became one of the original members of the Nabis as an art student at the Académie Julian, Paris, in 1888-9. He joined in the early group ventures such as printmaking, puppet plays and theatre design, but he was never involved with the more esoteric Symbolist aspirations of some of the group's leading members. He first exhibited at the Salon des Indépendants in 1891 and participated in the Nabis's group shows at Louis Le Barc de Boutteville's gallery. With Edouard Vuillard and Maurice Denis, he was quick to attract public attention, the nature of his work earning him the sobriquet 'le Nabi journaliste'. His art was inspired by contemporary life, with subjects drawn from the spectacle of modern Paris, particularly from the café, circus and boxing ring. Both in subject and technique he can be likened to such artists as Adolphe Willette, Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec and Théophile-Alexandre Steinlen, and his work shares many characteristics with theirs, notably an economy of line and a simplicity of shapes and colours. Such features derived in Ibels's case from the art of Honoré Daumier, Japanese printmakers and Paul Gauguin and the Pont-Aven group."