1946 Swiss Poster, Reine de Joie, Toulouse Lautrec, Les Editions Holbein
1946 Swiss Poster, Reine de Joie, Toulouse Lautrec, Les Editions Holbein
1946 Swiss Poster, Reine de Joie, Toulouse Lautrec, Les Editions Holbein
1946 Swiss Poster, Reine de Joie, Toulouse Lautrec, Les Editions Holbein
1946 Swiss Poster, Reine de Joie, Toulouse Lautrec, Les Editions Holbein

1946 Swiss Poster, Reine de Joie, Toulouse Lautrec, Les Editions Holbein

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Date: 1946
Size: 12.5 x 17.5 inches image
Artist: Toulouse-Lautrec, Henri (after)

From a catalog raisonné printed in 1946 by the prestigious Editions Holbein in Basle, Switzerland.

About The ArtistHenri de Toulouse Lautrec was slight in stature, incredibly off-beat in nature, and prodigiously talented in production of lithographs, paintings, posters and other artworks. Within less than 40 years (b. 1864- d. 1901), Lautrec created an unforgettable body of work that continues to inspire, to confound, and to captivate collectors the world over. His immersion in the colourful and theatrical life of the fin de siecle Paris yielded an oeuvre of exciting, elegant, and provocative images of the modern and sometimes decadent life of those times.

Toulouse-Lautrec is known as one the greatest artists of the post-impressionist period. In a 2005 auction at Christie's auction house, a new record was set when "La Blanchisseuse", an early painting of a young laundress, sold for $22.4 million U.S.

In excellent condition, ready to frame. 

Reine de Joie trivia: According to the Art Institute of Chicago, "This colourful poster publicized French author Victor Joze’s controversial novel Reine de joie (Queen of joy), which follows a young courtesan in Paris who convinces the wealthy Jewish banker Baron de Rosenfeld to compensate her with his money in exchange for her company.  The fictional Rosenfeld was loosely based on the real Baron de Rothschild, and Joze played up anti-Semitic stereotypes of the 1890s that characterized Jewish bankers as greedy, dishonest, and unrefined.  The book and poster inspired protests by Rosenfeld and his friends, who tore the posters off the walls of Paris’s many bookshops."